Sunday, 29 September 2013

Hiroshima - Unknown 1972

This is another great poster from OSPAAAL using simple pop art graphics, in this case by an unknown artist, to recall the bombing of Hiroshima in August 1945 by the American forces. The Cuban government's choice of August 6th for its day of world solidarity with the struggle of the Japanese people highlighted American aggression during a period when the Vietnam war was escalating. However in 1972 Japan, in contrast to a number of communist and socialist countries, had a democratic general election (won by the Liberal Democratic Party), a booming economy, and high levels of personal freedom. The Japanese people of 1972 may not have recognised the struggle represented by this poster.
solidarity with hiroshima ospaaal poster political japanese people

Solidarity with the Japanese People - Garcia 1971

August 6th 1945 was the day that the US air force dropped the first atomic bomb on Japan, striking Hiroshima and killing up to 160,000 of the city's inhabitants, most of whom were civilians. The mortality rate continued to rise for months from radiation and disease but the primary cause of death was from burns. Daniel Garcia's artwork for this 1971 OSPAAAL poster is sombre and thought provoking, making use of the partially obscured face of a young Japanese citizen and burnt paper to remind the world of the horror of that day. The Cuban government's anti-American stance features heavily in its poster output but the subject matter generally focuses on the politics and events of the day. This poster recalls the events of 25 years earlier to highlight the aggression of the American government midway through the conflict in Vietnam and at a time when the American bombing was intensifying.
solidarity with japan hiroshima ospaaal poster political